Administrative & Residual (A&R) Employees Union

State Employees Vote to Secure Jobs, Extend Benefits & Protect Services

Union members gathered in Hartford earlier today to announce that a strong majority of their colleagues have ratified agreements to shield against layoffs and preserve their healthcare and retirement security. The news came at the conclusion of a three weeks-long period in which approximately 25,000 state employees voted by a 5 to 1 margin to accept negotiated cost savings. In addition to a master agreement covering pensions and health benefits, union members also ratified 33 individual five-year contracts, retroactive to July 1 of last year.
 
Click here for the master agreement approved in June by union leaders.
 

Defending Retirees from Predatory Wall Street Fees​​

A new report reveals billions in potential savings if pensions slashed fees paid to hedge fund managers who invest in risky "alternative" assets such as private equity. The research, completed by our national union, for the first time quantifies the massive wealth transfer that has placed Americans' retirement security in peril. The findings are particularly important to understanding and resolving the mounting fiscal crises on states' balance sheets — the costs of which are ultimately being borne by taxpayers.
 
Click here for the full report.
 

Working Hard to "Prevent an Economic Disaster"

News that layoff notices for as many as 1,100 state employees will be delivered this week is causing considerable anxiety and frustration for union members and the public they serve. Governor Dannel P. Malloy announced the job cuts in late April — despite ongoing efforts to urge better choices than slashing vital services or the workforce that delivers them. Since then his administration's budget officials have warned of worsening deficits, adding urgency to a deepening crisis.
 
Click here for our previous update on the layoffs announcement.
 

State Employee Professionals Say "Union YES"

A national poll released last fall found that a strong majority of America's professional and technical employees support a collective voice for negotiating their wages and working conditions. The survey found nearly two-thirds of respondents favored joining unions in order to win improved salaries and regular pay raises. The poll's scientific results have been backed up over the past year by an uptick in unionization among Connecticut state employees not previously represented.
 

Spotlight: Teaching & Protecting Civil Rights

For the month in which the nation observes Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, we're spotlighting union members whose work carries on the social justice leader's legacy. Here in Connecticut, attorneys in the state's civil and human rights enforcement agency strive to confront ongoing discrimination faced by residents. At the same time, local public schools' educators teach their students the history of the movement that Dr. King led — and its relevance to struggles for justice and equality today.
 

Spotlight: Retirees Demonstrate "Senior" Activism

Retired members of AFT Connecticut-affiliated unions do not fit easily into popular, preconceived notions of life after employment; particularly those who remain engaged in the labor movement. Tomorrow is National Senior Citizens Day, and we're taking time to spotlight a few who not only defy stereotypes, but who exemplify "seniority" in both knowledge and experience.
 

Spotlight: Connecticut State Employees

As the week set aside each year to recognize the nation's public service workforce comes to a close, we're highlighting several state employees concerned about Connecticut's future. Each plays a unique role in contributing to our state's quality of life, but they all share similar worries over proposed budget cuts to safety, health and education services.
 

Spotlight: Labor Revenue Examiners & Accountants

For the month in which we celebrate Labor Day, we’re spotlighting union members who provide vital public services to Connecticut residents in between jobs and facing personal financial hardship. They are among the nearly 100 state workers at the Department of Labor (DOL) who make sure that critical unemployment assistance is delivered -- and have recently found themselves facing layoffs.
 
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